WinWeave 1.1 Help

Contents

Overview.. 2

Colors. 3

Palette. 4

Shades. 5

Edit 6

Files. 7

Mouse. 8

Multiple Document Interface. 9

Pattern. 10

Printing. 11

Region. 12

Loom Settings. 13

Status Line. 14

View.. 15

Pattern Snapshot 16

Yarn Calculator. 17

Definitions. 18

 

_659KTOverview

WinWeave is written for IBM PC's and compatibles in Turbo C++ for Windows, and will provide a graphical display of a pattern after you provide the draft.

Some basic features:

         up to 16 treadles, 16 shafts

         up to 1023 warp or weft threads

         rising or sinking sheds

         16 colors for color monitors

         ability to edit colors in palette

         5 "shades": black, dark grey, grey, light grey, white for monochrome monitors and printers

         view graphics pattern at three possible magnifications

         save patterns and portions of patterns as files for later editing

         editing capabilities: cut, paste or repeat warp or weft blocks; transfer between warp and weft; delete or insert individual threads; color substitution and exchange

         yarn yardage calculator

         For basic terminology, see the Pattern Snapshot. See also the help page for the Mouse and the help pages for each of the menu choices.

See Also

Multiple Document Interface

Colors

Your pattern can contain up to 16 different colors. These 16 colors make up a palette, which is displayed as a column of 16 squares on the right-hand side of the WinWeave window. When you select a thread in the warp or treadle region, that thread is assigned the active color for that region. The active warp color is displayed in the rectangle just above the tieup region, and the active weft color is displayed in the rectangle just to the right of the tieup region. The active color for either region can be any one of the 16 colors displayed in the palette. To change the active warp color, position the cursor on the desired color in the palette and click the left mouse button. To change the active weft color, position the cursor on the desired color in the palette and click the right mouse button.

You can change the colors in a pattern by means of various options in the Edit, Region and Pattern menus.

See Also

Edit, Palette, Pattern, Region, Shades

Palette

The Palette is the set of 16 colors with which you may design your pattern, and are given by 16 squares arranged in a vertical column at the right-hand side of your pattern window. While you are limited to a 16-color palette at any one time, you can edit any of the 16 colors using the palette editor dialog box. To edit one of the palette colors, position the cursor on the palette color you wish to edit and double click with either the left or the right mouse button. [Note that clicking with the left button also makes this the active warp color, or clicking with the right button makes this the active weft color.] A dialog box should then appear both for editing the palette and choosing the mapped monochrome shade, which may be useful should you wish to print your pattern on a black-and-white printer. You can control your color by manipulating directly the red, green or blue content using the respective scroll bars, on a scale from 0 to 255. You can also use the auxiliary quantities known as hue, saturation and luminosity. The hue measures the location of the color on the spectrum from violet to red. The saturation gives the color's purity, where 255 is the purest, and 0 represents grey (washed out). The luminosity gives the brightness of the color.

If your video monitor and card has a 256-color hardware palette, and the appropriate 256-color driver for that monitor-card combination has been installed in Windows, then the colors which you design in the palette dialog box will be represented as pure colors. If the palette has only 16 colors, then your custom colors will appear dithered. If you do not like the appearance of dithered colors, you also have the option of having the program find the nearest solid color from the 16-color system palette. You can choose between these options in the View menu. Regardless of your choice, the true color values will be saved if you write the palette to a file, and will be rendered as the correct true color if you then load the palette file on a computer with a 256-color hardware palette.

See Also

Colors, Files, Shades

Shades

Each of the 16 colors in the palette is associated with (mapped to) one of 5 possible shades of grey: black, dark grey, grey, light grey and white. These shades of grey are made by dithering black and white dots, and can thus be displayed accurately on monochrome monitors and printers. If you have a color monitor and wish to see how the pattern will appear on a monochrome printer, select the Mono Display option from the View menu. You can change back to color by selecting the Color Display from the View menu. Since there are only 5 shades of grey, it may turn out that the colors in your pattern map into identical shades, in which case the monochrome display will not differentiate your pattern. In that case, you can change the shade of grey associated with any of the colors in the palette by using the palette dialog box. To change the shade associated with a given color, position the cursor on the desired palette color and double click with either the left or the right mouse button. [Note that clicking with the left button also makes this the active warp color, or clicking with the right button makes this the active weft color.] A dialog box should then appear both for editing the palette and choosing the mapped monochrome shade, which may be useful should you wish to print your pattern on a black-and-white printer. You can cycle through the 5 shades by repeatedly pressing the Next Shade button. Press OK when you have the shade you want.

See Also

Colors, Palette

Edit

You can edit sections of the warp or weft regions using the mouse and the clipboard together with the options in the Edit menu. To highlight a block within one of these regions, click with the left button and drag the mouse in the slice between the pattern and the draft.

Choosing the Cut option causes the highlighted block to be copied to the clipboard and the corresponding weft or warp threads removed from the pattern.

Choosing the Copy option causes the highlighted block to be copied to the clipboard, but the corresponding weft or warp threads are not removed from the pattern.

Choosing the Paste option causes the block currently stored on the clipboard to be inserted at the location of the blinking caret. Note that the block on the clipboard can be cut or copied from either region.

Choosing the Duplicate Paste causes multiple copies of the block on the clipboard to be pasted at the location of the blinking caret.

Choosing the Color All option causes the threads in the highlighted block to be given the default color for that region.

Choosing the Reverse option causes the ordering of the threads in the highlighted block to be reversed.

Choosing the Delete Thread option causes weft or warp thread adjacent to the blinking caret to be removed. Its action is the same as cutting a single row or column, except that the information is not copied to the clipboard.

Choosing the Insert Thread option causes a single weft or warp thread to be inserted at the location of the blinking caret.

Files

Any pattern which you create can be saved as a file, which can be retrieved later for further editing or printing. In addition, you can save key portions of a pattern, such as the warp or tieup, for future loading or editing.

There are 5 basic file types:

         *.PTN - pattern files

         *.WRP - warp files

         *.TRD - treadling files

         *.TIU - tieup files

         *.CLR - color palette files

All pattern size, threading, treadling, shed and shade information, along with any description you provide, is saved in a pattern file. Warp files contain all information about a warp region, and they can be saved, loaded and deleted in the same fashion as complete pattern files. The same idea applies to treadle files and tieup files. Color palette files contain the color information for a specific palette, along with a specific mapping of the 16 colors to shades of grey when a monochrome display or print is requested.

When saving, loading or deleting files, choose the extension in the dialog box which appears when you select one of the file manipulation options. For example, to save or load a warp file, choose the .WRP radio button; a list of files already in your weaving directory with that extension will appear in the file list. You may then choose one of those files in the list or, if you are saving a new file, enter a new name up to 8 characters long. The .WRP extension is added automatically.

A note on the palette: specific palette information is not saved in a pattern file of type .PTN. Instead, colors are identified only by their relative position in the palette (i.e., second, tenth, etc.). The association of a relative position in the palette with a specific color and/or shade of grey via the palette and shade map, which can be saved in a .CLR file. If there is a specific palette which you wish to use regularly, you should save that with the special name WINWEAVE.CLR. It will then be loaded as the new default palette whenever you run WinWeave.

Mouse

Click the left mouse button on a palette square to select the active warp color [shown above the tieup].

Click the right mouse button on a palette square to select the active weft color [shown to the right of the tieup].

Double click the right or left mouse button on a palette square to initiate a dialog box for editing the palette for that color, as well as for choosing a mapped shade for printing.

Click the left mouse button in any of the regions thread (warp), tieup or treadling (weft) to select that region.

Click the right mouse button in a region deselects that item.

Click the left mouse button in the slice between the pattern and the draft to position the cursor making any changes to the pattern.

Click with the left button and drag the mouse in the slice between the pattern and the draft to highlight a block for cutting or copying to the clipboard; you can paste between warp and weft, or between patterns.

Multiple Document Interface

The Multiple Document Interface is a feature which allows you to work on several patterns at the same time. Each pattern is itself a window inside the main WinWeave window, and it can be resized, minimized, moved, etc. Each pattern window can also have its own palette, choice of color rendering, and magnification.

To open a new pattern window, select the New option from the File menu. You can easily switch between pattern windows simply by clicking anywhere on the desired window with the left mouse button. You can arrange your pattern windows or their icons using the options from the Window menu. For example, to view two patterns side-by-side, select the Tile option.

Pattern

You can manipulate aspects of the entire pattern using various options in the Pattern menu:

To change all threads of one color in the pattern to another color, select the Substitute Color option. A dialog box will open, allowing you to choose the "before" and "after" colors from a palette.

To exchange two colors of all threads in the pattern, select the Exchange Color option. A dialog box will open, allowing you to choose the two colors you wish to exchange from a palette.

To flip the pattern, i.e., to exchange the threading and treadling drafts, select the Flip Pattern option.

To force the pattern to a square weave, also known as "Trompe as writ", select the Trompe as writ option. This will copy the threading draft onto the treadling draft. The colors are not copied.

To add a description of your pattern which will be displayed on the status line at the bottom of the window, as well as saved when you write a pattern to a file, select the Description option. Your description may contain up to 60 characters.

To compute the required yardage for your pattern, select the Yarn Calculator option.

See Also

Multiple Document Interface

Printing

You can print your design in three different ways.

To print the pattern, or a section of the pattern, use the scroll bars if necessary so that the upper right-hand corner of the pattern window represents the upper right-hand corner of the printout you want, select the Print Pattern option from the File menu. A dialog box will appear, from which you can select the size of the pattern threads in pixels. That is, 8x8 means that each square of the printout measures 8 pixels on a side. You can choose the size in multiples of two from 8x8 to 64x64. Your specific choice will depend upon the resolution of your printer, so you will want to experiment first. In any session of WinWeave, the default value of the thread square size will be that of your previous selection, but you can still change it each time.

To print the drafts and the tieup only, select the Print Tieup+Drafts option from the File menu. It is useful for having a threading template when threading the loom, or a treadling template when weaving.

To print the drawdown, select the Print Drawdown option from the File menu. The drawdown print consists of the threading and treadling drafts and the tieup, alongside the pattern. If necessary, several pages will be used to cover the threading and treadling drafts. Each page of the printout covers approximately 36 warp ends 55 weft ends. For example, a drawdown with 50 warp ends and 150 weft ends would require 2x3=6 pages.

The total number of pages to be printed for any print request is displayed in a dialog box while the print is being formatted. If you decide that you don't want to print that many pages, or otherwise don't wish to print at the moment, just click the Cancel button.

For prints of the pattern or the drawdown, the style of the printout depends upon your choice of View options, including Interlace vs Color+Weave as well as the color rendering options.

Region

You can manipulate the design of your pattern by using the mouse in one of three regions: warp, tieup and weft (or treadle).

The tieup region determines how the loom shafts (or harnesses) are connected to the treadles. A given shaft is connected to a particular treadle by clicking the appropriate square in the tieup with the mouse. A connection can be removed by clicking the square a second time with the mouse.

A loom has either a rising shed or a sinking shed, that is, the shafts either rise when a treadle is pressed, pulling their warp threads above the weft threads, or the shafts sink, pulling the warp threads below the weft threads. For a loom with a sinking shed, connections to the shafts are denoted by X's, and, for a rising shed, they are denoted by O's. You can change between rising and sinking shed by selecting the Loom Settings option from the Settings menu.

You can manipulate aspects of the warp or weft region using various options in the Region menu. The following selections will take effect for the active region, i.e., the region indicated by the blinking caret:

If your warp or weft threading consists of a repeated draft, you can have WinWeave repeat the drafts for you. First, use the mouse to position the blinking caret at the last thread of the draft which you wish to repeat over the entire region. You can either select a thread at that point or simply position the caret by clicking the left mouse button with the cursor positioned in the gap between the draft and the pattern. Then select the Mark Draft option. This determines the length of the draft. A draft marker, or small line, will appear which denotes the outermost edge of the draft, and the number of outermost thread will appear in the warp or weft status box. Select the Repeat Draft option to fill the region with copies of the draft.

To erase the entire region, select the Erase option.

To color the entire region with the active color for that region, select the Color All option.

To change all threads of one color in a region to another color, select the Substitute Color option. A dialog box will open, allowing you to choose the "before" and "after" colors from a palette.

To exchange two colors of all threads in a region, select the Exchange Color option. A dialog box will open, allowing you to choose the two colors you wish to exchange from a palette.

See Also

Colors, Loom Settings, Status Line

Loom Settings

Use the Settings menu to configure the features of your loom and to save commonly used configurations for later WinWeave sessions.

To configure the features of your loom, select the Loom Settings option. A dialog box will open, in which you specify the number of shafts (harnesses), the number of treadles and whether your loom has a rising or a sinking shed.

To save your loom settings so that they will automatically take effect each time you run WinWeave in the future, select the Save Loom Default option. This will create the file WINWEAVE.TIU, which also includes the tieup in effect at the time you save the file.

To save the palette so that it is automatically loaded each time you run WinWeave, select the Save Color Default option. This will create the file WINWEAVE.CLR.

Status Line

The status line provides information about the pattern in the active window which is not necessarily obvious by inspecting the pattern.

The Warp status box may look something like this:

Warp: 5 [25]

In this example, the 5 means that the blinking caret, when it is activated in the warp region, is located at thread 5, counting from the rightmost warp thread. The 25 means that the threading draft as presently marked has 25 ends, that is from 1 through 25. This draft can be repeated throughout the entire warp region by selecting the Repeat Draft option in the Region menu when the warp region is active6K9.9C. If the 25th warp end is visible on the screen, you will also see a draft marker, which is a small vertical line denoting the outermost edge of the draft, and located in the gap between the threading draft and the pattern.

Similarly, the Weft status box may look something like this:

Weft: 7 [50]

In this example, the 7 means that the blinking caret, when it is activated in the weft region, is located at thread 7, counting from the top weft thread. The 50 means that the treadling draft as presently marked has 50 ends, from 1 through 50. This draft can be repeated throughout the entire weft region by selecting the Repeat Draft option in the Region menu when the weft region is active. If the 50th weft end is visible on the screen, you will also see a draft marker, which is a small horizontal line denoting the outermost edge of the draft, and located in the gap between the treadling draft and the pattern.

If the pattern has been modified since it was last saved to a file, the word Modified will appear.

If your pattern has a description, it will also appear on the status line. You can enter a description by selecting the Description option from the Pattern menu.

View

You can control the way you view your patterns from the View menu.

You can magnify or demagnify the pattern by means of the Zoomin and Zoomout options. The allowable thread square sizes are 4, 8 and 16 pixels on a side.

You can choose from two pattern display styles. Color+Weave (the default) shows blocks of solid colors (or monochrome shades). Interlace gives you a picture of threads woven over and under each other.

You can choose from four color renderings of the pattern. Color Display (the default) shows the pattern in terms of the colors as chosen in your palette. Monochrome Display shows a dithered monochrome pattern. This is useful for seeing how a pattern will look before printing on a black-and-white printer. Structure [White Warp] forces all warp threads to be white and all weft threads to be black. Structure [Black Warp] is the other way around.

If your video monitor and card does not support a 256-color palette, or the appropriate Windows video driver is not installed, you may want to choose between Dithered Color rendering of any custom colors which you define, and a Nearest Color rendering.

Pattern Snapshot

See Also

Edit, Mouse, Palette, Definitions

Yarn Calculator

The yarn calculator is a dialog box which is activated by selecting the Yarn Calculator option from the Pattern menu, or via the Ctrl-Y key.

The calculator will use your pattern to compute yardage after you enter basic information about the desired fabric and your loom:

         warp ends per inch (dents per inch in reed)

         weft picks per inch

         warp waste (in)

         fabric width (in)

         fabric length (in)

When you have entered these numbers, click on the Calc button to obtain the required yardage of each yarn color, given in the output panel.

Note: since woven fabric usually involves repeated warp and weft sequences, the yarn calculator uses the threading and treadling drafts repeatedly as it counts threads of each color until it reaches the desired width and length of the fabric. Be sure that you have marked the threading and treadling drafts that you wish to have repeated before using the yarn calculator. Otherwise the results you get may not be what you really want.

You can print the results of the yardage calculation by clicking the Print button. The colors are listed in the order given by the vertical Palette, with a letter label, but you can write in the name of the color in the blank which follows.

Return to pattern editing by clicking Return.

See Also

Pattern, Region

Definitions

Dithering refers to the process of giving successive pixels on a screen or page differing values in order to achieve a certain shade of grey or color to the eye when the pure shade or color is not available on that device. Shades of grey in a newspaper photograph or on a black-and-white printer are rendered by dithering black and white dots. For a color device with a limited number of colors in its palette, a requested color may be rendered by dithering the pure colors in the palette.

A block is a section of highlighted threads, either in the warp or the weft region, which can either be cut or copied to the clipboard.

A draft is the rectangular grid of marks which determines the threading through the shafts (threading draft) or treadling sequence (treadling draft). The pattern is determined by the threading and treadling drafts, plus the tieup.

The caret is the blinking solid rectangle which displays the weft or warp thread location which you have just modified. The caret appears in the area between the threading or treadling draft and the pattern itself. You can position the caret without modifying the pattern by clicking with the left mouse button at the point where you would like the caret to be.

The active region is one of the warp, weft and tieup regions which you have most recently modified, and can be identified by the location of the blinking caret. Actions which you select from the Region menu take effect in the active region.